Do You Have to Put Up With “Locker-Room” Talk in the Workplace?

Blog Post
September 5, 2018
Read Time: 3 minutes

Many people face workplace sexual harassment on a daily basis. It can come in many forms, including derogatory comments, inappropriate touching, repeated advances, propositions, pressure to laugh at inappropriate jokes or being forced to look at explicit imagery. And it can be difficult to know what to do.

Denying Employees’ Benefits Based on Age is Discrimination and Unconstitutional

Blog Post
August 23, 2018
Read Time: 4 minutes

While mandatory retirement ended over ten years ago, older workers are unfortunately not immune from age-related discrimination. In Talos v. Grand Erie District School Board, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario looked at a situation where an older worker lost his benefits when he reached the age of 65.

Ontario election expected to determine survival of Human Rights Code amendments

Blog Post
May 22, 2018
Read Time: 4 minutes

Proposed changes to Ontario’s Human Rights Code that would have prevented discrimination based on social condition, genetic characteristics, immigration status and police records, was quashed when Ontario’s 41st Parliament was dissolved on May 8, 2018. However, lawyers practicing in areas that involve human rights should remain aware that the proposed amendments represent significant changes to human rights law in Ontario.

Copyright for Animal Selfies – Monkey Business?

Blog Post
May 4, 2018
Read Time: 3 minutes

Can a monkey sue for copyright infringement? Our latest Intellectual Property blog post looks at the “monkey selfie” copyright dispute and the relevant law in Canada.

A Much-Needed Amendment to Ontario’s Human Rights Code

Blog Post
May 2, 2018
Read Time: 4 minutes

On October 4, 2017, Liberal MPP Nathalie Des Rosiers introduced a private member’s bill titled the Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2017 (“Bill 164”). If passed, Bill 164 would amend Ontario’s Human Rights Code to add four new prohibited grounds of discrimination: social condition, genetic characteristics, immigration status and police records. This post explores the definitions of these new grounds, and the implications for employers and employees.

The Right to One’s Image – Privacy Laws in Quebec

Blog Post
April 23, 2018
Read Time: 3 minutes

The civil remedies available to deal with the problem of “revenge porn” are still in their early stages of development in Ontario. By contrast, the principles applicable to these cases have been settled for quite some time in Quebec. This post looks compares Ontario privacy law with the law in Quebec.

Welcome, Patrick Brunet

Blog Post
February 22, 2018
Read Time: 1 minute

The Employment Law Practice Group at Nelligan O’Brien Payne LLP is pleased to announce a new member of the team, associate lawyer Patrick Brunet.