Thinking of Using a Gift to Pay Off the Line of Credit on your Home?

Blog Post
April 24, 2014
Read Time: 2 minutes

Thinking of using a gift to pay for the line of credit on your home? You may want to think carefully about your decision, but there is reason to hope that you might get at least some of your gift back in the event of a separation. Here’s why. In 2012, the scope of equalization litigation was expanded with the Court of Appeal for Ontario’s decision in Ward v. Ward. If you are thinking about using a gift to make a payment on your matrimonial home, you would be wise to consult your family lawyer first to weigh the pros and cons of your decision.

Little Known Facts about the Matrimonial Home

Blog Post
March 14, 2014
Read Time: 2 minutes

The ‘matrimonial home’ is a very special creature, and legal issues in relation to it can have a very large impact on a spouse’s financial situation in the context of a separation. A house is only considered a ‘matrimonial home’ if the spouses living in it are married, and not in a common law relationship. If you are thinking about getting married and already own a home, you should consider getting some advice from a lawyer to find out if you should take steps to protect the value of your home in the event of a separation or divorce.

‘Til Death do you Part…but not Really: Family Law Obligations Placed upon Estates

Blog Post
November 14, 2013
Read Time: 2 minutes

Many people believe that they can evade their family law responsibilities, such as child support or spousal support throughout their lives, and that all obligation ends with they themselves die. Evidently, such people have never heard of something called Dependants’ Relief Claims (DRC’s).

When to Negotiate: Routes to Resolution in Separation and Divorce

Blog Post
October 24, 2013
Read Time: 2 minutes

Many people who have not had much or any involvement in family law think that everything is done through the courts. This is simply not true; separations and all the issues that stem from them can be resolved without the involvement of courts (except for the final step of obtaining a divorce if the parties are married). Although negotiated resolutions are preferable, they may not be possible and it is important to recognize this if you want your matter to be resolved in the most efficient way.