The Pitfalls Of Being A Landlord On Reserve

October 25, 2016
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If you own a home on a First Nations reserve or on territory that is subject to a treaty or self-government agreement – and you’re not living in it – you may be tempted to rent it out in order to make some extra money. Before you do, make sure you’re aware of the rules that apply to residential tenancies in that territory. This post will discuss the issues for landlords.

Own-Source Revenue

September 21, 2016
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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to strengthening the relationship between the government and First Nations. An important aspect of improving relations is recognising and supporting indigenous communities’ right to self-government. While funding and services from Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) aims to provide assistance and improve conditions for First Nations, indigenous peoples are also able to generate funds through own-source revenue.

“Sixties Scoop” Survivors Take Their Claims to Court

September 1, 2016
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In the wake of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, which began in the courts and went on to transform the national conversation about Canada’s colonial history, Indigenous peoples are turning more and more to class actions to seek redress for historical wrongs.

Indigenous Resources Part 2: The Tungasuvvingat Inuit

August 19, 2016
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Established in 1987, the Tungasuvvingat Inuit is a non-profit organization providing diverse programming to suit the needs of the urban Inuit community. Their mission is to enhance the health and well-being of Inuit in urban cities and to encourage and support similar programs across Canada.

Indigenous Women and the Law – The Design of the MMIW Inquiry

July 27, 2016
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After country-wide consultations, the Government of Canada has released a report that will guide the design of the federal inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls. From the look of things, the legal system could be a major point of focus in the final design of the inquiry.

Daniels: What Does It Mean?

June 30, 2016
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When the Supreme Court of Canada issued its decision in Daniels v. Canada (Indian Affairs and Northern Development), it changed the landscape of Indigenous rights. This decision impacts provincial and federal governments, industry and non-status Indian and Metis communities. More importantly, governments will have to rethink their policies and way of doing business, or not doing business, with non-status Indians and Metis peoples.

The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: A New Era for Canada?

June 16, 2016
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It’s taken a long time for international law to recognize the rights of Indigenous peoples, and even longer for Canada to get on board. But with the Canadian government recently promising to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and Cree Member of Parliament Romeo Saganash introducing an historic bill in the House of Commons, we have arrived at a potentially pivotal moment for Indigenous rights.

Indigenous Language Education: Is it an Aboriginal Right?

May 10, 2016
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Canada’s Indigenous languages are in danger of disappearing. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has urged the government to make Indigenous language education a priority so that these traditions can be carried on into future generations. Recently, however, there have been suggestions that the ability to educate one’s children in an Indigenous language could be claimed as an Aboriginal right under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Supreme Court expands definition of “Indians”

April 29, 2016
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Are Métis and non-status Indians considered to be ‘Indians’ under s. 91(24) of the Constitution Act, 1867? Henry Daniels asked the courts this question in 1999, and 17 years later, the Supreme Court of Canada gave him an answer: ‘Yes’.

Indigenous Resources Part 1: the Odawa Native Friendship Centre

February 23, 2016
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The Odawa Native Friendship Centre is a non-profit organization providing services to the Aboriginal community in the Ottawa-Carleton Region of Eastern Ontario and the surrounding area. It has been operating since 1975 and provides diverse programming to suit the needs of the urban Aboriginal community.