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In parts one and two of this series, we outlined the possible civil and criminal consequence of posting an intimate photo or video of your ex online following a separation.

But what about the consequences for your family law proceeding?

Woman looking at phoneIn addition to the civil and criminal consequences you can be liable for if you engage in revenge porn, such conduct can also have a detrimental impact on your family law proceeding.

For example, perhaps posting an intimate photo of your ex online has resulted in them losing their job, or an opportunity at a promotion. If this happens, then you may have to increase the amount you pay in spousal support (or receive less money if you’re the recipient) because your former partner can no longer earn what they previously earned as a result of your actions.

If you have kids, engaging in revenge porn may also have an impact on custody and access. Posting intimate online content of your former partner is very likely to drive a further wedge between you, and could make a joint custody arrangement unworkable that would have otherwise been possible.

In addition, the posting of such content could have a negative impact on your kids from a practical level, as online content is often readily accessible to all, including your kids and/or their friends.

Therefore, in addition to the civil penalties and criminal convictions that can result from revenge porn, it may also have unintended consequences in the resolution of your family law proceeding.

The moral of the story? Don’t do it.

If you need information about revenge porn, contact our Family Law Group.

Author(s)

This content is not intended to provide legal advice or opinion as neither can be given without reference to specific events and situations. © 2021 Nelligan O’Brien Payne LLP.

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