The Financial Impacts of Bill 148: Looking Beyond Minimum Wage

Article
September 27, 2017
Read Time: 3 minutes

As even the most casual observer of current events is aware, the Ontario Government introduced legislation that will increase minimum wage from $11.40 to $15.00 an hour by January 1, 2019. Bill 148, the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act (“Bill 148”) was introduced and referred to committee on June 1, 2017, just days before the provincial legislature rose for the summer.

Draft covenants with care

Article
March 17, 2017
Read Time: 4 minutes

The case of Donaldson Travel has been added to the long list of cautionary tales for employers who are drafting restrictive covenants in employment contracts.

Busted for pornography at work… what are the consequences for employees?

Article
March 3, 2017
Read Time: 4 minutes

Access to the Internet is now a fixture in Canadian workplaces and pornography can be accessed in seconds by a few keystrokes and the click of a mouse. This has created unique problems for employers, who are faced with making decisions about employees caught electronically accessing, storing or distributing pornography at work or on employer-owned devices.

Earned Bonuses: Payable Upon Termination?

Article
August 16, 2016
Read Time: 3 minutes

With its recent decision of Paquette v. TeraGo Networks Inc., the Ontario Court of Appeal offered some much-needed clarification regarding the payment of bonuses during the reasonable notice period.

Definition of ‘creed’ could include ethical veganism

Article
March 4, 2016
Read Time: 3 minutes

According to section 5 of the Ontario Human Rights Code, every person has a right to equal treatment with respect to employment without discrimination because of creed. In addition, every person who is an employee has a right to freedom from harassment in the workplace by the employer or their agent or another employee because of creed.

The No Trial Solution

Article
September 4, 2015
Read Time: 3 minutes

Accessibility to justice has been a growing concern in the Canadian legal landscape for some time. The required steps in a litigation file are numerous, the caseloads of our judges are overwhelming, and the delays inherent in any file, especially from the party with the deeper pockets, are becoming inordinate. For many individuals, the amount of money required to see a case through to trial is simply not worth the expense, leading them to settle at an earlier stage, and often for less than what they are truly owed. This is especially true in the employment law world.

When Terminated for Just Cause Instead of Just ‘Cause

Article
September 19, 2014
Read Time: 8 minutes

There exists an inequality of bargaining power between employees and employers, especially at the time of dismissal. Even though the law has evolved in a way that tries to protect employees as much as possible, employers still hold the ultimate card: they can terminate an employee’s employment whenever they want, for whatever reason, so long as they do so in accordance with the applicable human rights laws and they pay them enough money (with some exceptions, of course). However, an employee will be disentitled from such payments if their employment is terminated for just cause.