Expanding our Employment Law Helpline

Blog Post
October 15, 2020
Read Time: < 1 minute

On March 25th, we launched our free COVID-19 Employment Law helpline. Since then, we have helped hundreds of people whose employment situations were affected by COVID-19 navigate their options and understand their rights. Today, we are expanding our helpline to provide free assistance to employees in Ontario related to their human rights in employment. Nelligan… Read more »

A legal timeline of 2SLGBTQ+ Rights in Canada

Blog Post
August 24, 2020
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In August, Nelligan Law and the City of Ottawa are celebrating Capital Pride. 2SLGBTQ+ rights have come a long way in Canada. Our Family Law group has created a timeline that revisits key legal decisions and events that have contributed towards progression 2SLGBTQ + rights in our country. While progress has been made, it is… Read more »

Working Remotely and the Exacerbation of Toxic Workplaces

Blog Post
May 5, 2020
Read Time: 2 minutes

Throughout this pandemic, employers and employees alike have been challenged to adapt and find creative ways to meet workplace demands. For some individuals, this shift may have heightened already existing issues in the workplace. Employers and employees must be able to identify when heightened anxiety, frustration and challenges within a team amounts to a toxic… Read more »

Workplace Harassment While Working from Home

Blog Post
April 27, 2020
Read Time: 3 minutes

Nelligan Law gratefully acknowledges the contribution of Grace Tran, Student-at-law, in writing this blog post. COVID-19 has resulted in many individuals working from home. But does working from home stop workplace harassment? Not necessarily. The Internet, technology, mobile devices, and social media have changed where “work” occurs. “Work” is no longer compartmentalized and defined by… Read more »

Denying Employees’ Benefits Based on Age is Discrimination and Unconstitutional

Blog Post
August 23, 2018
Read Time: 4 minutes

While mandatory retirement ended over ten years ago, older workers are unfortunately not immune from age-related discrimination. In Talos v. Grand Erie District School Board, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario looked at a situation where an older worker lost his benefits when he reached the age of 65.

Discrimination in Canada’s Prisons: Risk Assessment Tools and Indigenous Prisoners

Blog Post
August 14, 2018
Read Time: 3 minutes

A recent Supreme Court of Canada case, Ewert v. Canada, found that some of the risk assessment tests employed by Canada’s prison system may in fact discriminate against Indigenous prisoners. The Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies (CAEFS) and the Native Women’s Association of Canada intervened on this case at the Supreme Court of Canada. Pam MacEachern and Natasha Chettiar represented CAEFS on a pro bono basis.

Ontario election expected to determine survival of Human Rights Code amendments

Blog Post
May 22, 2018
Read Time: 4 minutes

Proposed changes to Ontario’s Human Rights Code that would have prevented discrimination based on social condition, genetic characteristics, immigration status and police records, was quashed when Ontario’s 41st Parliament was dissolved on May 8, 2018. However, lawyers practicing in areas that involve human rights should remain aware that the proposed amendments represent significant changes to human rights law in Ontario.

A Much-Needed Amendment to Ontario’s Human Rights Code

Blog Post
May 2, 2018
Read Time: 4 minutes

On October 4, 2017, Liberal MPP Nathalie Des Rosiers introduced a private member’s bill titled the Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2017 (“Bill 164”). If passed, Bill 164 would amend Ontario’s Human Rights Code to add four new prohibited grounds of discrimination: social condition, genetic characteristics, immigration status and police records. This post explores the definitions of these new grounds, and the implications for employers and employees.

Bill C-16 and Transgender Rights

Blog Post
July 19, 2017
Read Time: 2 minutes

Last month Bill C-16 was finally given royal assent. The bill, which adds protection of gender identity and expression to the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Criminal Code, received a 67-14 vote in favour of the bill in the Senate. The passing of the law is regarded by many as a historic moment, bringing federal human rights laws in line with the provinces and territories.